Weight Lifting Exercises

18 Oct 2011 Sports and Fitness

Weight lifting and Exercises Metabolism
 

  • Trapezius
  • Deltoids
  • Chest
  • Triceps
  • Biceps
  • Forearm
  • Abs

 
Trapezius
“Get huge traps!”
EXERCISES
Upright Rows

  • Use a close or wide grip.
  • Bring the bar up to the chin.
  • The elbows should come up higher than the bar.
  • Exhale on the lift.

Dumbbell Shrugs

  • Hold the dumbbells with your palms facing inward and the weights hanging at arms’ length at your sides.
  • Drop both shoulders down as far as possible then raise your shoulders while rotating them in a circular motion from front to rear. Keep your spine as straight as possible.
  • You can do this standing or seated on a flat bench with your feet on the floor.
  • The non-rotating version is shown here.
  • You can also do this with a barbell.

Most shoulder exercises also work the traps
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Deltoids
“Get so wide you have to turn sideways to get through a door!”
EXERCISES
Overhead Barbell Press

  • Legs should be shoulder width apart.
  • Press the bar up in your direct line of vision.
  • Don’t arch your back when pressing up.
  • Don’t lockout you elbows at the top of the movement.
  • Exhale on the lift.
  • Your arms should be 6 -8 inches wider than should width.
  • This can be done in front or behind the neck.

Upright Rows

  • Use a close or wide grip.
  • Bring the bar up to the chin.
  • The elbows should come up higher than the bar.
  • Exhale on the lift. A narrow grip primarily works the traps, a wide grip will shift the strain to the side delts.

Side Lateral Raises

  • Can be performed seated or standing.
  • gradually rotate the wrists so that the little finger is highest. It is like pouring a jug of water. Works the side delts for width!

Front Lateral Raise

  • Same as the side lateral raise except you raise the dumbbells to the front.
  • This works the front delts primarily. You can also use a barbell or do one arm at a time.

Overhead Dumbbell Press

  • Hold two dumbbells above your head.
  • With a slow motion move up and down keeping the dumbbells facing end to end.
  • Have a friend help you lift the weights to your start position for the first rep. Great deltoid exercise!

Arnold Press

  • Invented by Arnold Schwarzenegger! Same at the dumbbell overhead press except your have your palms facing your head at the bottom of the movement. Slowly twist to the top position where the dumbbells touch end to end.

Almost any exercise for back or chest also works the shoulders. Hit them hard for a few sets directly but be careful not to overtrain them! Injuries are very common to this area.
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Chest
“Pack pounds onto your chest!”
EXERCISES
Full Bench Press Video w/ Audio! (MPG, 37 sec., 3.95MB)
Basic Bench Press Video without Audio (MPG, 16 sec., 1.58MB)
Bench Press

  • Lie on your back and take the barbell from the supports, using a grip that is six to eight inches wider than shoulder width.
  • Lower the bar slowly to the nipple region, and then press it back to the locked-out position.
  • Don’t bounce it off your chest! Don’t let your butt come off the bench!
  • If you have trouble keeping your back on the bench without arching, put your legs up in the air. Mainly works the lower chest region, but the whole pectoral-deltoid area is stimulated.

Decline Bench

  • The opposite of incline.
  • Works the lower outer chest region.
  • Some bodybuilders say this stresses the chest harder than flat bench presses.
  • Adjust the bench between 30 – 45 degrees depending on what feels best.

Incline Bench

  • Set the bench to an angle of 25 – 30 degrees if possible.
  • Bring the bar down to the center of the chest just under the chin. Works the upper chest mainly, along with the front delts and triceps. As you increase the angle, the stress shifts from the upper chest to the shoulders.

Cable Crossovers

  • Grab a handle from the high pulley in each hand.
  • Lean forward with one foot in front and slowly bring the cables together.
  • Maintain tension in the pecs! Slowly return to the starting position.

Dumbbell Press

  • Similar to the barbell version, but you use two dumbbells.
  • With the dumbbells pointing end to end lower them to your sides. Pause at the bottom, and then press to arms’ length.
  • Dumbbells give you a greater range of motion for a greater stretch. Develops the pec-delt tie-ins and the inner chest.

Incline Dumbbell Press

  • The inclined version of the flat dumbbell press.
  • Lower the dumbbells slowly, going for a full but controlled stretch at the bottom. Great for developing the upper chest!

Incline Flyes

  • Lie face up on the incline bench.
  • Grab a dumbbell in each hand and place them at arms’ length above your shoulders with palms facing inward and the arms straight.
  • Using a semi-circular motion, lower the weights down to each side of the chest.
  • Keep your elbows slightly flexed!
  • Works your inner pecs. You can also do this on a flat bench.

Pullovers

  • Be sure to keep your feet flat on the floor.
  • Hold a dumbbell over your head with your arms as straight as you can keep them.
  • Slowly lower the weight back behind your head until your arms are parallel to the floor.
  • You can also do this with your body perpendicular to the bench. Works your pectoralis minor.

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Triceps
“Get big triceps fast!”
EXERCISES
(toddclose.mpg, 31 sec, 2.91MB)
Close-Grip Bench Press

  • These place intense stress on the inner pectorals, anterior-medial deltoids, and of coarse, triceps.
  • The narrower the grip on the bar, the more stress you place on the triceps and the less you place on pecs and delts.
  • Your grip should leave your index fingers 5-8 inches apart.
  • Have a training partner help you lift the weight off the rack so that your arms are above your chest.
  • Be sure that your upper arms travel nearly directly out to the sides.
  • While slowly bending your arms, lower the weight to your chest.
  • Without bouncing the bar, slowly push the weight back up to starting position.
  • This exercise can also be performed on incline or decline benches. Try varying the width of your grip to see how it differently if works your pecs, delts, and triceps.

Triceps Parallel Bar Dips

  • This is generally considered a pectoral excersize, as it places intense stress on the pecs, anterior-deltoids and triceps, but when the torso maintained erect underneath the body, this is one of the best movements for the triceps.
  • Jump to a supported position on the bars with your palms facing inward, arms straight, legs bent, and ankles crossed.
  • Keep your torso perfectly erect throughout the movement.
  • Bending your arms, lower your body as far down between the bars as possible.
  • Without bouncing in the bottom position, slowly raise your body to the start position. When you become strong enough to use extra weight, you can dangle a dumbbell or plates beneath you with a rope or belt.

Pulley Pushdowns

  • This basic movement stresses the entire triceps muscle complex, particularly the outer and medial heads.
  • Grip the bar overhand with your index fingers no more than 3-5 inches apart in the middle of the handle.
  • Your feet should be shoulder width apart about 10-12 inches back from the handle.
  • Fully bend your arms, pressing your upper arms against your torso, where they should stay through the duration of the set.
  • Leaning slightly forward, move your forearms down, slowly straightening your arms.
  • Hold the straight-arm position momentarily, while flexing your triceps intensely.
  • Slowly return to the starting point. A good variation is the rope handle. You can also do this exercise with an undergrip on the bar and with different width grips.

Lying Barbell Triceps Extensions

  • These fundamental favorites isolate intense stress on the triceps, particularly the medial and outer heads.
  • Taking a narrow overgrip in the middle of a moderately weighted barbell, lye on your back on an exercise bench.
  • Keep your feet on the sides of the bench to provide balance.
  • Extend your arms straight up above your head.
  • With your upper arms remaining motionless throughout the set, bend your elbows allowing the barbell to travel downward in a semicircular arc until it slightly touches your forehead.
  • Reverse the direction of the movement of the bar using only tricep strength to slowly straighten your arms. There are many effective variations, such as using different grip widths, doing them seated, using an undergrip, or using a decine or incline bench.

(toddext.mpg, 26 sec, 2.34MB)
One-Dumbbell Triceps Extensions

  • This movement stresses the entire triceps muscle complex, particularly the inner and medial heads.
  • Take the dumbbell and grip it so that your palms are facing the inner-top plate and the dumbbell is hanging straight down (perpendicular to the gym floor).
  • To keep the weight from slipping, encircle your thumbs around the dumbbell handle.
  • Lift the dumbbell straight up above your head. This is the start position.
  • Lower the weight slowly behind your head until your arms are full bent.
  • Without bouncing in the bottom position, slowly raise the dumbbell back to the start position. You can increase the strictness of this movement by sitting at the end of a flat exercise bench, or on the floor with your back braced against the bench.

Standing Barbell Triceps Extensions

  • This is a fundamental triceps exercise, stressing the inner and medial heads of the triceps muscle complex.
  • Take a narrow overgrip in the middle of a moderately-weighted barbell.
  • With feet about shoulder width apart, stand erect and extend your arms straight up from your shoulders.
  • Keep your upper arms in the same position, while you lower the weight slowly behind your head until your arms are completely bent.
  • Without bouncing in the bottom position, slowly raise the bar back to the start position. You can vary the width of your grip on the bar or use an undergrip to isolate different parts of the muscle. You can also do these seated to isolate your legs from movement, making the exercise somewhat stricter.

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Biceps
“Build your biceps beyond belief!”
EXERCISES
(toddcurl.mpg, 34 sec, 3.13MB)
Barbell Curls

  • Undergrip the bar at shoulder-width.
  • Avoid swaying your torso to help you move the weight… that’s Cheating.
  • Press your upper arms against the sides of your torso to keep them in position throughout the set.
  • Use biceps strength to curl the weight in a semicurcular arc to your chin.
  • Powerfully contract your biceps at the finish position, then slowly lower the bar back to your thighs.
  • Experiment with different width grips to work different parts of the bicep muscle. You can also do these kneeling.

(todddbcurl.mpg, 44 sec, 3.89MB)
Dumbbell Curls

  • Like barbell curls, these place intense stress on the biceps and lesser stress on the forearm.
  • The undergrip is the primary method used to grip the dumbells, but for variation and to add more stress to the forearms, use an overhand (supinated) grip.
  • Press your upper arms against the sides of your torso to keep them in position throughout the set.
  • Use biceps strength to curl the weight in a semicurcular arc to your chin.
  • As the dumbbells reach the halfway point, rotate the wrists so that your palms are facing upwards (pronation) for the second half of the workout.
  • Powerfully contract your biceps at the finish position, then slowly lower the bar back to your thighs.
  • To intensify the work on your biceps, this exercise can be done seated. You can also alternate dumbell curls, lifting one weight as the other is coming down. Try these while seated on an incline bench to rip you a new one!

Hammer Curls

  • Hammer curls work the biceps incredibly intensely; however, they are intended as a brachialis and forearm supinator exercise.
  • Press your upper arms against the sides of your torso to keep them in position throughout the set.
  • Use biceps strength to curl the weight simultaneously upward and foreward in a semicurcular arc to shoulder level.
  • Powerfully contract your biceps at the finish position, then slowly lower the bar back at your sides.
  • To intensify the work on your biceps, this exercise can be done seated.
  • If seated, you can alternate hammer curls.

Concentration Curls

  • Sit with your feet 4-6 inches wider than your shoulders.
  • Grasping the dumbbell in hand, brace the back of your tricep against the inside of your thigh near your knee.
  • Use biceps strength to curl the weight in a semicurcular arc to your chin.
  • Your arm should be completely straight with the weight at your hand. Your other arm can either be rested on your other knee or wedged the triceps of your working arm.
  • With palm facing forward (supination), slowly contract your biceps to bring the weight up to your shoulder.
  • Tense your biceps as strongly as possible in this peak-contracted position, then lower the weight slowly back along the same arc to the starting position. The real key to this exercise is mental concentration. Stay focused on working those biceps!

Barbell Preacher Curls

  • This is an excellent overall mass builder for the biceps, particularly adding mass to the lower biceps near the elbow.
  • Lean over the preacher bench with your arms parallel.
  • Grasp the barbell or have a training buddy place the barbell into your supinated (palms face-up) hands.
  • The upper edge of the bench should be wedged under your armpits.
  • Use biceps strength to slowly curl the weight directly upward to shoulder level.
  • After reaching the peak, slowly return the weight to starting position.
  • Don’t attempt to bounce the weight in the bottom position, as your biceps are vulnerable to injury. Ease the weight down.
  • You can also do this exercise with dumbbells; both arms at a time arcing slightly larger than your elbows’ width, or concentrating hard on one arm at a time. You can also do this with a reverse palms-down grip to stress the forearms.

Lower Cable Curls

  • Bodybuilders use this exercise to isolate the biceps.
  • Grasp the handle on each side of you and stand with your hands face up.
  • Use biceps strength to slowly curl the weight toward your shoulder, keeping your elbow in the same place.
  • At the finish position, flex your biceps to give an additional burn.
  • Lower the weight slowly back along the same arc to the starting position.

High Cable Curls

  • Same as the above exercise, exept use the upper handles, pulling the weight from above.
  • Be sure to keep your elbows in the same position as you bring the weight towards your shoulders.
  • At the finish position, flex your biceps to give an additional burn.
  • Slowly uncurl your arms back along the same arc to the starting position.

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Forearm
“Look like Popeye!”
EXERCISES
Barbell Wrist Curls

  • Use a light weight.
  • Have your palms facing up.
  • Keep your elbows stationary on a bench or on your knees while sitting.
  • Most bodybuilders use a rep range between 12 – 15. Experiment to see what works best for you.

Reverse Wrist Curls

  • Same as the Barbell Wrist Curl except with a reverse palms-down grip.
  • Use a light weight. Keep your elbows stationary

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Abs
“Get a cut six-pack!”
AB EXERCISES
Parallel Bar Leg Raises

  • These aren’t as extreme as hanging from a chinup bar but more difficult than regular leg raises. With your elbows and forearm braced on the parallel bars to hold your weight, lift your legs straight up parallel with the floor, then lower them slowly.

Bent-Knee Leg Raises

  • Same as above except with bent knees.

Crunches

  • These are known to be very intense isolating movements for your abs. They equally distribute the stress from the top to the bottom of the adbominal wall. They place secondary emphasis on the intercostals.
  • So, how do you properly do them? While lying on your back, either hold your legs at a 90 degree angle in the air with your lower legs parallel to the floor, or drape them over a bench or piece of furniture.
  • With your fingers interlocked behind your neck, raise your shoulders and back off the floor, force your deltoids toward your legs, and pull your hips upward.
  • Finally, exhale your breath. Hold the contraction for a moment, then slowly lower yourself down again.

Machine Crunches

  • These stress the entire rectus abdominus wall to the max. The intense isolation works the intercostals as well.
  • Adjust the seat height, so that your toes are comfortable beneath the restraint. Hold on to the upper body restraint(s).
  • Now, with an appropriate weight chosen, crunch down and go to town. Be sure to keep your abdominal muscles stretched and go slow to really feel the burn.

List of other ab exercises…

  • Sit-Ups – They are the most basic and common adbominal exercise. Sit-ups work the entire rectus abdominus. You can perform them twisting to one side then the other to hit the obliques and intercostals. They can be performed on the floor or on an incline sit-up bench. With your feet hooked under the restraint and your fingers interlocked behind your neck, crunch your body together!
  • Roman Chair Sit-Ups – These relatively new exercises are designed to isolate the entire abdominal wall, especially stressing the upper half. If done with a twist to one side or the other, these can really work the obliques and intercostals. Simply sit at the Roman chair, hooking your toes around the restraint bar. Cross your arms and crunch! Slow and deliberate motions will really get those abs burning.
  • Leg Raises – These are fundamental for building ripped abs. Lie on an ab board or on the floor. Bend your legs at a 15-20 degree angle and crunch your legs toward your abs in a semicircular arc.
  • Bench Leg Raises – These are just leg raises that are done with your hips at the end of a bench so that you can get a far better range of motion and intensely work your lower abdominals.
  • Hanging Leg Raises – Quite a bit more intense than regular leg raises, these place stress on the entire abdominal wall, but primarily the lower half. Hanging from a chin-up bar with your legs bent at about 15-20 degrees, lift your legs until your feet are higher than your hips. Then, slowly lower your legs back down to starting position.
  • Knee-Ups – These are to be performed on the end of a flat bench. Grasp the sides of the bench with your hands behind your hips and extend your legs with a 15-20 degree bend. Slowly bend your legs and bring your feet toward the bench, then extend them again.
  • Hanging Frog Kicks – These are a more intense version of knee-ups. While hanging from a chinning bar with an overhand grip, move your knees up to your chest while bending your legs completely. Hold this position for a really great burn then slowly lower your legs back to the dangling position.
  • Pulley Crunches – These are a really cool way to work your abs. They not only stress the rectus abdominus to the max, but they also involve some muscle tensing of the lats and serratus anterior muscles at your sides. Use the upper cable of a pulley machine with the rope handle attachment. While on your knees, grasp the ends of the rope with both hands and pull downward with your arms and abs until you touch the floor about 4 inches ahead of your forehead. Hold this position for a two count, then slowly raise back up so you can do it again! Remember to exhale during the contraction. You can do this exercise with one arm at a time or from side to side to involve the intercostals and obliques more.
  • Side Bends – This is a great exercise to completely target your obliques. While standing, grasp a dumbell in one hand and allow it to hang at your sides. Put your other hand behind your neck. Let the dumbell pull that side of your body down as far as possible, bending only at the waist. Then use the obliques of the opposite side to pull your body back erect. About 30 reps on each side and you will be feeling it!
  • Seated Twists – Ready to tone your transverse obliques under your regular obliques? These are the answer. Reportedly these can help trim the waist line and are a great warm up exercise. While seated straddling the middle of a flat bench, place an unweighted light bar or broom stick across your lats, behind your neck. Grasp the ends of the bar with your hands. Forcefully twist at your waist left to right in a rhythm…they get tiring!
  • Standing Bent-Over Twists – These are very similar to seated twists except that instead of sitting, you are actually leaning forward twisting from side to side with your hands grasping the ends of the bar across your shoulders.

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